Mar 18, 2015

TV Recap: Brooklyn Nine-Nine - "Sabotage"

The Golden Globe-winning comedy series Brooklyn Nine-Nine returns for a second season of hilarity and crime. After an impressive first season that chronicled one of the best new ensembles solving problems and forming unexpected relationships, the series is back to tackle bigger things. Will it be as great as the first season? Stay tuned every Wednesday for the recap on that week's episode to find out through interesting tidbits including the best jokes and what the crew is up to that week.

Andy Samberg
Crime of the Week: Someone is framing Peralta (Andy Samberg) for a whole series of crimes that causes him to be suspended.


Peralta Problem: After being suspended, Peralta must figure out if someone has it out for him.

Left to right: Chelsea Peretti and Terry Crews
Subplot of the Week: Gina (Chelsea Peretti) must figure out how to live life after Holt (Andre Braugher) causes her to think of dancing as a hobby.

Crews
Best Joke: As Holt tries to figure out how to recoup his problems with Gina, Jeffords (Terry Crews) tells him to lie. In the process, he tells a story about his children having bunnies in their stomachs that leads to a whole slew of problems.

Chris Parnell
Culprit: Geoffrey Hoytsman (Chris Parnell) reveals that he is sabotaging Peralta for making him go to jail.


Resolution: Holt and Gina rekindle their problems. Hitchcock (Dirk Blocker) and Scully (Joel McKinnon Miller) reveal that they are incompetent on purpose because they don't want to be promoted. Peralta is saved from Hoytsman's trap by Santiago (Melissa Fumero) and Diaz (Stephanie Beatriz), who in return arrest him. Peralta gets his job back. 


Verdict: Once again, the series remains just as strong as ever with a series of interesting plots. The most noteworthy one involves the return of Hoytsman, whose performance in this episode is rather absurd and interesting thanks to the setting inside of an ice cream truck. He is a great villain on par with The Pontiac Bandit. It is also nice to see Hitchcock and Scully get their own story developed, even if it seems odd still that they purposefully act incompetent in order to not get promoted. It's both interesting and baffling. Overall, the jokes are strong and features a nice array of problems from the precinct. I especially like that Holt has a moral dilemma and seeks advice from Jeffords about figuring out how to solve it.


Rating: 4 out of 5

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